Acupuncture Herbal Center Logo

A Natural, Comprehensive Healing Center
in San Rafael, CA (415)485-5834  Languages: English, Chinese, Spanish (Web)

PractitionersInterview D. Claiborne | Interview S. Wang | Contact | Sitemap | EMAIL
Acupuncture | Herb Store | Standard Process and MediHerb Products | Osmosis / Skincare

We specialize in these conditions and treat many more:
Infertility | Back, Neck & Joint Pain | Facial Rejuvenation | Pediatrics | Allergies | Sports Injuries
Digestive & Stomach Disorders
| Menopause | Teen Acne
| Orthopedic Pain-Related Conditions
Lyme Disease
| Cardiovascular Diseases

Acupuncture Herbal Center, San Rafael, CA Acupuncture Herbal Center Acupuncture Herbal Center Acupuncture Herbal Center Acupuncture Herbal Center Acupuncture Herbal Center Acupuncture Herbal Center Acupuncture Herbal Center Acupuncture Herbal Center Acupuncture Herbal Center
Partial list of other conditions treated:

Acne and Skin Disorder

w

Allergies and Sinusitis

Arthritis and Joint Pain

Anxiety and Insomnia

Asthma and Bronchitis

Back, Neck and Shoulder Pain

Bell's Palsy

Bursitis and Tendonitis

Cardiovascular Diseases

Chronic Fatigue

Common Cold and Cough

Digestive Disorders & Dietary Principles According to Traditional Chinese Medicine

Facial Rejuvenation

Gastrointestinal Disorder

Headaches

High Blood Pressure and Pre-Hypertension

Hip, Groin, Sacral Pain and Strain

Infertility

Liver Disease and Hepatitis

Lyme Disease

Menopause

Menstrual Disorder - Teens and Adults

Pediatric Conditions

P.M.S. - Teens and Adults

Neurological Disorders

Sciatica, Hip, and Leg Pain

Shingles

Stroke and Paralysis

Sports Injuries

Substance Abuse

Smoking

Teen Acne

Weight Loss

Dietary Principles According to Traditional
Chinese Medicine

Deirdra Claiborne specializes in promoting a healthy diet using dietary principals according to traditional Chinese Medicine. She treats patients with high cholesterol, stress, anxiety, digestive disorders, bloating (such as stagnation and excessive phlegm) and suggests a diet to promote health.

In Chinese medicine, fresh, seasonal diet plays a significant role in maintaining health and vital energy. Some important guidelines are:

• Enjoy your food in a relaxed atmosphere
• Eat foods that are high in fiber
• Chew food well
• Eat portions of food that won’t overtax the system
• Eat seasonally, organically and locally
• Do not skip meals
• Keep the body hydrated

Any deficiencies or excesses in our bodies are directly affected by the food we consume. The Chinese diet is based on the theory of Yin & Yang - foods are categorized by flavors, which have specific influences on the body.
A variety of flavors is recommended.


The Five Food Flavors are:

Sweet: To strengthen, moisten and tonify. In moderation, sweet foods benefit the spleen & stomach. In excess, they damage the digestive system, and can cause abdominal distention, goiter, swelling of the lymph glands, laziness and obesity.

Pungent: To disperse stagnation and promote flow. In moderation, pungent foods benefit the lungs & large intestine. In excess, can lead to diminished strength, dizziness and emaciation, as well as burning sensations and tremors.

Salty: To moisten, soften and detoxify. In moderation, salty food benefits the kidneys & bladder. When used in excess, impairs kidney function, causes stagnation of blood, wasting of muscles and can aggravate skin conditions.

Sour: To stimulate absorption and contraction, helping break down fat. In moderation, sour food nourishes the liver & gallbladder. In excess causes sensitive teeth, twitching of the eyes, a flacid body, and creates edema in those with injuries.

Bitter: To counteract dampness. In moderation, bitter foods nourish the heart & small intestine. In excess, they produce dryness & reduce appetite.

Dampness - The digestive system is slowed down by foods that are damp/cold in nature (such as ice cream, iced drinks) as they tend to put out the "digestive fire". This slowing of the transformation of energy and blood weakens the digestive system. Some symptoms of dampness in the body are: fatigue, body heaviness, sluggishness, excess weight, cysts, tumors, yeast infections, bloating and gas, unclear thinking, chronic sinus infections, cloudy urine, foul smelling stools, thick tongue coating.

Foods to Avoid to Reduce Dampness
dairy
wheat
cold drinks, cold raw foods, fruit juice
breads, pasta, pastries, processed foods, refined flour
refined sugar and sugar substitutes
deep fried foods
alcohol, coffee

avocado, bananas, peanuts and peanut butter

Foods to Eat to Reduce Dampness

organic lightly cooked vegetables, celery, corn, pumpkin, turnip, watercress
alfalfa sprouts, button mushrooms, capers, radish
amaranth, barley, brown rice, oats, rye
adzuki beans, kidney beans, legumes, lentils
small amounts of lean organic fish, meat, poultry
small amounts of whole fruits, lemon
kelp, pumpkin seeds, seaweed, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds
green tea, jasmine tea, raspberry leaf tea

Yang energy is responsible for warming and activating bodily functions.
Symptoms of
Yang Deficiency include: cold hands and feet, frequent, pale urination, low libido, low back pain or weakness, pre-menstrual lower back pain, shortened luteal phase.

Foods to Avoid for Yang Deficiency
cold food and liquids
raw foods especially in the fall and winter
damp producing foods


Foods to Add to Tonify Yang
(tend to be warming and drying)
chestnuts, pine nuts, pistachios, walnuts
lamb, trout, venison
black pepper, cinnamon, clove, dill, fennel, garlic, ginger, peppermint, chai & jasmine tea
cayenne, horseradish, nutmeg, rosemary, sage, thyme, turmeric


Yin energy is responsible for moistening and cooling. Symptoms of Yin Deficiency include: internal heat, hot flashes, night sweats, ringing in the ears, prematurely grey hair, lower back pain, vaginal dryness, shortened menstrual cycle.

Foods to Avoid for Yin Deficiency
sugar
alcohol, caffeine, cigarettes
artificial stimulants, recreational drugs


Foods to Add to Tonify Yin (tend to be cooling and moistening to the body) hot spicy foods
barley, millet, sesame seeds, black sesame seeds
adzuki beans, black beans, kidney beans, black soya beans, mung beans
duck, egg, fish, pork
artichoke, asparagus, peas, potato, seaweed, sweet potato, yam
apple, banana, pear, pomegranate, watermelon

 

Nourishing Bone Broth Base Recipe

Boost your health with this nutrient, mineral-rich stock!
It’s a great way to support one’s health, especially when recovering from an injury or illness
and is easily digested.

Ingredients:

  • 2 lbs of organic chicken bones. If using fish, use wild salmon bones
  • 1 medium onion, unpeeled & quartered
  • 6 large cloves of garlic, unpeeled, cut in half
  • 3 celery ribs, cut into 2 inch pieces
  • 3 carrots, cut into 2 inch pieces
  • 2 small knuckles of ginger unpeeled
  • 1 bay leaf
  • ¼ bunch watercress or cilantro
  • 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar - helps draw out the nutrients from the bones.
  • 2 tablespoons cumin
  • 3-4 quarts water (enough to immerse above ingredients)
  • If you desire salt use sea salt or Himalayan salt

Directions:

Add all of the ingredients to a large crock-pot or slow cooker. Cook on low for 10 to 12 hours. While still warm, pour and smash through a wire mesh strainer to remove solid bits in order to get all nutrients. The fat contains a lot of nutrition, do not skim it.

Broth can be refrigerated for 5-7 days. After that, it can be frozen. For convenience, freeze it in 2-4 cup portions.

This broth can then be used to make soups and stews or as a liquid to cook brown rice, grains or any recipe calling for chicken broth.  You can also drink it as is.

In Chinese Medicine, bone broths are used to support the digestive system, strengthen the kidneys, protect the liver, and build blood.  It is a mineral-rich strengthening food for healing support during recovery of an illness, surgery and post-partum recovery. Bone broth is used to strengthen the bones, reduce inflammation, and supports joints and tendons. It also nourishes nails, hair, skin (increases collagen) and the gut.

Nourishing Soup Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups of the above Bone Broth base
  • Organic bouillon (we like Organic Better Than Bouillon Chicken Base – 1 heaping Tbls)
  • 2 stalks Celery - quarter sliced
  • 1 handful Cilantro - diced
  • 2 stalks Green Onions – diced
  • 2 organic eggs, beaten – add towards the end
  • Options:  Organic peas, zucchini, organic ground chicken (sautéed or raw

Directions:
Add above ingredients, except for eggs. Cook until vegetables are tender.  Mix in egg.  Can add Sea Salt

This soup is perfect in times of colds, flu, and digestive discomfort or on weekly basis throughout the year to improve and protect your health.

 

For more information call 415.485.5834

Acupuncture Herbal Center Partial List of conditions treated About

Practitioners
About Acupuncture
Herbs
Clinic
Homepage
Interview Deirdra Claiborne
Interview Dr. Samuel Wang

Acne and Skin Disorder
Acute and Chronic Pain
Allergies and Sinusitis
Arthritis and Joint Pain
Anxiety and Insomnia
Asthma and Bronchitis
Back, Neck and Shoulder Pain
Bell's Palsy
Bursitis and Tendonitis
Cardiovascular Diseases
Chronic Fatigue
Common Cold and Cough
Digestive Disorders
Dietary Principles
Facial Rejuvenation
Gastrointestinal Disorder
Headaches

High Blood Pressure and Pre-Hypertension
Hip Pain

Infertility
    Infertility Synopsis     
    Infertility Synopsis PDF
Liver Disease and Hepatitis
Lyme Disease
Menopause
Menstrual Disorder - Teens and Adults
Pediatric Conditions
P.M.S. - Teens and Adults
Neurological Disorders
Sciatica, Hip, and Leg Pain
Shingles
Stroke and Paralysis
Sports Injuries
Substance Abuse
Smoking
Teen Acne

Weight Loss

Clinic
Directions and Maps
Contact
Awards
Testimonials

Acupuncture Herbal Center, 824 5th Ave. San Rafael, CA 94901, (415) 485-5834, © Acupuncture Herbal Center, 2017

Email:
info@acupuncture-herbal.com

Acupuncture Herbal Center